Monday, September 26, 2005

Neuropsychology Assessment of Dementia: Early Detection

From an American Psychological Association (APA) press release on 25 September 2005:
PSYCHOLOGISTS FIND MORE SENSITIVE TESTS FOR PREDICTING ALZHEIMER'S AS WELL AS SUBTLE CHANGES IN COGNITION
Implicit-memory tests are stronger predictors than the common Mini Mental [Status] exam[ination; i.e., MMSE]; Alzheimer's may hurt attention well before obvious memory loss

Washington — Two recent studies may help clinicians and researchers better predict and understand dementia of the Alzheimer's type early in its history.  Both studies appear in the September issue of Neuropsychology, which is published by the American Psychological Association (APA).  Psychologists focus on early detection in part because current medications are useful only when given very early in the course of the disease. 
[ ... Read the full press release ... ]

The papers are:

Pauline E.J. Spaan, PhD, Jeroen G.W. Raaijmakers, PhD, & Cees Jonker, PhD, MD. Early assessment of dementia:  The contribution of different memory  components. Neuropsychology, 2005, Vol. 19, No. 5.

Janet M. Duchek, PhD, & David A. Balota, PhD. Failure to control prepotent pathways in early stage Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type:  Evidence from dichotic listening. Neuropsychology, 2005, Vol. 19, No. 5. 

The press release provides links to access the full-text contents of both scientific papers in .pdf form.
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Anthony H. Risser
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